Discussion: Jami

This is an official discussion thread linked from the www.privacytools.io website. This thread can be used for troubleshooting, questions, discussions and if you look for alternatives.

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I’m researching a bit on Jami and wanted to give it a try.

Your IP address and that of the contacts you’re communicating with may be visible if you do not use the software in conjunction with a self contained network, such as Tor or I2P. Many countries have some form of mass surveillance and/or metadata retention.

Who does actually (can) see my IP and how?

Since it is a P2P software you are connecting directly with another user without the need of a third party like a server provider that receives your messages and sends them to your receiver like WSP, Signal, etc. So the only person who can see your IP is the person you are talking to. You can easily solve this with a VPN or Orbot.

This is technically not possible as long as your device and the recipient’s device aren’t directly connected with a network cable. There are actually more parties that can see your network traffic, even if you are using P2P apps. For instance, your ISP and the ISP of the recipient still see your network traffic/IP address, routers and switches in your network still see your network traffic/IP address, and many P2P apps rely on DHT discovery, so your app likely connects to other IP addresses in order to work.

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Sadly, after having tried Jami 3 times now, every time it fails to work. It just can’t receive messages from other users. I waited hours after sending my message to a friend and they received nothing.

Noble goals, but terrible execution.

I have to give it a 1 out of 10 as it fails to deliver messages.

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I am sad to say that I have also given up on it.

It’s a instant messenger which is a subject it might be fair to say I am addicted to, so I have thrown them away from autostart and there is no point in starting Jami as no one else uses it, unless they are testing something.

I am already monitoring IRC, Riot, Telegram, XMPP and Wire, that should be more than enough for anyone and I have a lot of email notifications and email too if someone really wants to contact me and has nothing in common.

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Same here, recently unninstalled the app after having it for quite a few months just to try it out once in a while to see if it works now. I’m using Session as my main IM, there are still some bugs and things that could be improved but it has great usability for a project that reached stable version something like two months ago.

Session seems good. I’m waiting on the version that has the white theme. Currently using TwinMe which works great, but people are confused as to how to add contacts. Session makes it easy in comparison.

Shame about Jami. I love the goal of a cross platform p2p opensource messenger.

Maybe someone should tell their team that the product doesn’t work

I don’t know when that will happen, I do know that in one or two months they are going to upload their application to F-droid, that will make upgrading a lot easier since now you can only choose between G Play store or GitHub releases.

I have never tries TwinMe, so I don’t know really. Is it open source?

They know already, but it’s hard to make a P2P messaging platform work well I guess, since the same happens with Briar. Still, I think a decentralized platform works better for instant messengers, since it is harder to shut down and if technologies similar to Session are applies, you can route your traffic through an anonymizing network, which makes the use of it more private and eliminates IP correlation attacks as threat.

Hopefully in the future …sometime in the not too distant future, they will fix it.

24 days later I have started supporting Jami again by moving all instant messengers from autostat to a script and my situation is

on the rest, I currently have 10 chat apps open (of which 8 are for different protocols) + 4 pinned tabs in Firefox all of different protocols and I can confidently say that communication through computers is horrible and everything has something wrong and at best there can be least bad options and for me those depend on the category and I keep finding a matterbridge in the middle of it in text-based communications

I decided to use/test Jami more for voice/video calls these days, in order to lower centralized services’ servers load. Will see how it goes. But it’s for sure not so good for multiple devices, which is more or less expected for p2p services.

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Sure it is best to use p2p and not centralized services, but ,at the bare minimum it has to at least be able to send/recieve messages, which for me failed all the time.

Session works well. It has all the benefits of Jami with non of the drawbacks.

But Session doesn’t have audio and video calls and conferences, right? Also, if message has to go through several nodes, it also makes additional (unnecessary) traffic.

But as you mentioned, Jami doesn’t work as good as I thought. Will test it more, but it is not something I would advise/expect my friends to use. For sure it has special use case, and I hope people behind the project will continue working on it

No, there are issues created that ask for such features but I doubt they will do it until end of year at least, they are working on cross device support for stability and it will take them between onr or two months, but who knows. It would be great, there would be at least a functional, true private IM.

I don’t know if its unnecesary, I guess it is a good practice if you want to prevent the IP as a threat, and also you won’t be sending heavy data, Tot handles 3 hops for websites and it’s pretty fast.

It doesn’t have those features but that’s why there exists Jitsi.

Have to say, for my use case there seems to be no alternative to Jami. I need a messenger that runs on android and ios (so my contacts can use it), and also on linux, with voice / video calling. In the P2P / battery hog category, briar only supports text at the moment and also is android exclusive. I have tried matrix and more or less everything privacytools suggests, but I find Jami the best fit due to its multiplatform & multifunction support and is a true whatsapp replacement for those looking to shift others off that platform.
It does need a lot of configuring to work properly sometimes (especially on android) but on the whole it’s fairly good at what it does and gets a decent amount of support from savoir-faire. Sending any kind of file can be a nightmare though.

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